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© Pete Saloutos/Panoramic Images (Washington Title Image Large)

Welcome to LandScope Washington


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Washington has a remarkably rich natural heritage. From pounding surf to alpine meadows, from ancient rainforest to sagebrush desert, our state boasts an incredible diversity of ecosystems.  These ecosystems - the ocean waters, conifer-covered slopes, volcanic peaks, shrub-steppe and grasslands, deep coulees, rolling hills and valleys - are home to a tremendous diversity of plant and animal life. 

Yet Washington is changing, largely as a result of tremendous population growth. The pace of change brings challenges.  Washingtonians are meeting these challenges by being engaged in conservation activities; there are many success stories to share on this website.  And there is, of course, more work to be done. We hope that LandScope Washington provides useful information about conservation needs and priorities, along with a sense of hope for the future of our natural heritage.

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Lead Partners

  • Washington Natural Heritage Program

    The Washington DNR Natural Heritage Program (WA NHP) manages information on rare plants and rare ecosystems. The role of the WA NHP is to identify species and ecosystems that are conservation priorities for preserving Washington's biodiversity.

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  • Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    The WDFW mandate is to preserve, protect, perpetuate, and manage the fish and wildlife species of the state. The department also provides opportunities for people to hunt, fish, and appreciate fish and wildlife.

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Featured Places in Washington

  • South Puget Sound Prairies

    Created by retreating glaciers and sustained by native peoples, the rare prairies and oak woodlands of the South Puget Sound remain dependent on human activity to preserve them.

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  • Klickitat River Corridor

    The Klickitat River runs through the East Cascades ecoregion, where coniferous forest transitions to oak woodlands and open shrub-steppe and grasslands.

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